Suggested Reading & Other Sources

Good To Great In The Social Sector

by Jim Collins

Steppenwolf Theatre in Chicago requires all of its Board Members to read this monograph, which is an addendum to Jim Collins’s business strategy book Good To Great. This booklet educates commercially-minded Board Members about how to apply their business philosophies to a non-profit organization.

The Art of the Turnaround

by Michael Kaiser

“Michael Kaiser has a unique combination of artistic vision and executive talent that makes him one of the most capable leaders in the performing arts. This book tells the story of his impressive leader- ship. As my brother said in 1960, “The New Frontier for which I campaign in public life can also be a New Frontier for American art,” and he’d be very proud of all that Michael Kaiser has accomplished.” – Senator Edward M. Kennedy )

Leading Roles: 50 Questions Every Arts Board Should Ask 

by Michael Kaiser

“Not-for-profit arts organizations struggled to survive the recent economic recession. In this increasingly hardscrabble environment, it is absolutely imperative that the boards of these organizations function as energetically, creatively, and efficiently as possible. Michael M. Kaiser’s personal history with boards of arts organizations began when he served on the board of the Washington Opera (now the Washington National Opera) in 1983. Today, in his capacity as president of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Kaiser recently completed a 50-state, 69-city Arts in Crisis tour. Board issues came up repeatedly as central to the success or failure of the organization. Drawing on these and many other conversations, nationally and internationally, Kaiser’s book offers members of boards and staffs the information they need to create the healthy atmosphere necessary to thriving arts organizations. Organized in a clear, readable, question-and-answer format, Leading Roles covers every aspect of board participation in the life of the organization, including mission and governance; fundraising and marketing responsibilities; the relationship of the board to the artistic director, executive director, and staff; and its responsibilities for planning and budgeting. Kaiser addresses boards in crisis, international boards, and boards of arts organizations of color. Throughout, he emphasizes the importance of transparency and clarity in the board’s dealings with its own members and those of the arts community of which it is a part, showing how anything less results in contentiousness that can immobilize an arts organization, or even tear it apart.”

Art Boards: Creating A New Community Equation

by Nello McDaniel & George Thorn

This short publication includes three essays on the concepts, assumptions, roles and functions of arts boards.

The New Rules of Marketing & PR: How to Use Social Media, Online Video, Mobile Applications, Blogs, News Releases, and Viral Marketing to Reach Buyers Directly

by David Meerman Scott

“This is the book every ambitious, forward-thinking, progressive marketer or publicist has at the front of their shelf. Business communication has changed over the recent years. Creative ad copy is no longer enough. The New Rules of Marketing and PR has brought thousands of marketers up to speed on the changing requirements of promoting products or services in the new digital age. This is a one-of-a-kind, pioneering guide, offering a step-by-step action plan for harnessing the power of the Internet to communicate with buyers directly, raise online visibility, and increase sales. Its about getting the right message to the right people at the right time – for a fraction of the cost of a big-budget advertising campaign.”

One comment on “Suggested Reading & Other Sources

  1. I have been surfing online more than 3 hours today, yet I never found any interesting article like yours. It is pretty worth enough for me. Personally, if all webmasters and bloggers made good content as you did, the net will be a lot more useful than ever before.

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